NGRef: SE0821
OSMap: LR104
Type: Temple Or Shrine

Roads
None identified

In 1597 an inscribed altarstone was discovered at Bank Top, Greetland, about 2 miles south of Halifax and 2 miles north of the Roman fort and minor settlement at Slack in West Yorkshire. It is possible that this altar represents the remains of a rural shrine. The stone now resides in Trinity College, Cambridge.

Altarstone from Greetland, West Yorkshire

D VICT BRIG ET NVM AVG T AVR AVRELIANVS D D PRO SE ET SVIS S MAG S

ANTONINO III ET GETA II COS

"To the goddess Victoria Brigantia¹ and the divine spirit of the emperor, Titus Aurelius Aurelianus dedicated this offering for himself and his family, while [serving as] Master of Sacrifices²

The consuls [being] Antoninus for the third time and Geta for the second time.³"

(RIB 627; altar; dated: 208AD)

  1. There is another altar dedicated to this dual/conflated deity at Castleford, also in West Yorkshire (R.I.B. 628).
  2. Assuming on the expansion MAG[ister] S[acrorum].
  3. This line, appearing on the right hand side of the stone, gives us the year it was dedicated. From January 208AD (a.u.c. 961) for a period of one year, Imperator Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus Proconsul (the future emperor Caracalla) was consul for the third time, with his younger brother Publius Septimius Geta serving as his junior colleague, himself for the second time; they had shared the same office together three years previously. The emperor who shares the dedication with the goddess is Septimius Severus (Imp. 193-211AD).
See: Chronicle of the Roman Emperors by Chris Scarre (Thames & Hudson, London, 1995);
Chronology of the Ancient World by E.J. Bickerman (Thames & Hudson, London, 1980);
The Roman Inscriptions of Britain by R.G. Collingwood and R.P. Wright (Oxford 1965).
All translations, including any inherent mistakes, are my own.